FDISK.COM
ADD and ADHD

Welcome to FDISK's ADD/ADHD page. For the uninitiated ADD is the abreviation for Attention Deficit Disorder, a poorly named disorder that affects roughly 5% of the American population. I believe ADD is an improper name because of the word "deficit." A better name would be Inconsistent Attention Disorder--the reason becomes apparent when you read the description. Dave sent over another unique name, "Actively, Divinely, Different." I like it, but I generally don't feel divine so I can't say it really describes me...

ADD can be roughly described as "a neurological syndrome that is usually genetically transmitted [and can be] characterized by distractibility, impulsivity[,] restlessness" and the ability to hyperfocus. (1) The "H" in ADHD stands for Hyperactivity which is often found in people with ADD. It is still becoming understood and is a topic of considerable debate.

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Some feel that the diagnosis of ADD or ADHD is a cop out or farce. They say that everyone has these symptoms and that we are giving people an excuse for poor behavior. What those people are missing, however, is that the average ADD person doesn't want an excuse. They just want to be able to function better.

Other people feel that ADD is the yuppie flu of the 90's--The age of technology at the speed of light has created a race of distracted, impatient people. Well, in 1975 I was labled by doctors with the term "hyperactive." ADD wasn't well known then, but they knew my behavior wasn't normal. I was the classic ADD case..all before it became the popular "catch all diagnosis" that disbelievers seem to think it is.

If you want to find out more about ADD via the WWW, you should probably start out at the ADDA Home Page. They have a lot of good information. After that, you can come back and check out my ADD Links Page. I also have a very nice publication from The National Institute of Mental Health called ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER - Decade of the Brain. Bob Seay has a good list of FAQs at add.about.com.

Looking for something to read? Check out www.pediatricneurology.com which seems to be a pretty fact filled place.

Dave commented that I didn't have any links to parent perspective pages and offered his own. If you dare, check out From Birth to Hell - Living with A.D.H.D. In the Family which details the antics of their daughter.

If you are like me and a zillion links dumped on a page just make your head cloud up, then try my .Random AD(H)D (or related) Site link. This will take you to a random selction from my link page. Some may have little specifically to do with ADD, while others are Pro or Against ADD or its treatments. I did weed out a couple of pages that were only built to antagonize the people who have ADD, but there still may be a couple that question its validity.

Cool news. Bob Shea's ADD site has a java powered, realtime ADD CHAT.

I am not an expert, but I am a member of the club. I realize it is hard to comprehend the concept of ADD if you don't have first or second hand expearence with it. I know how hard it is to imagine how it feels to be without ADD.

Lets see...I'm just about to check the disk space on the news server and the phone rings. When the call is over I remember to check the news server...NOPE. I just can't imagine the feeling of recall after a distraction! We are just not talking once in a while here either--it is a constant battle.

Looking for more examples? A second opinion of sorts? For people with a sense of humor, I have the .You know you have ADD when... page. Everyone is welcome to contribute to this page, but please read the rules before submitting. Remember, this page was created to show the humor in some of the odd things ADD people do or forget to do. If you feel this is in poor taste, then just don't visit!

There is another site out there spreading ADD humor and it also has a You Know You're ADD When... section! As far as I know, both fdisk and the Humorous ADDults Intriguing Themselves site were created totally independent of each other.

I have seen perscription drugs work on ADD. I'm not just talking about a drugged sheep that can behave in a classroom but a person who can finally organize thoughts and work better with other people without serious conflict. Based on that I'd have to say that I am open to the idea of using them. Not everyone agrees of course, and here is a site with alternative views and treatments: http://www.add-adhd-help-center.com/. Personally I am not stuck on any one way to make a better life. I believe that part of the battle is won solely by finding something you can get on board with. If you believe in something then it can work for you. If drigs aren't your thing then hopefully an alternative will help.

An ADD book author contacted me for a link and since the pages seem to do a good job of condensing the useful information about ADD, I decided to put it here. The following description was author provided. www.adhdhelp.org provides useful answers that parents of ADHD/ADD children must have. Includes: stimulants, testing & diagnosis, diet, supplements, stimulants, Ritalin, Concerta, Adderall, Dexedrine, Cylert & behavior management.

I received an email from someone who has Asperger's Syndrome who suggested that I mention this subject. He said there may be some people with Asperger's who might read about ADD and lean towards that as their diagnosis. If you believe you have noticible impairments in two-sided social interaction and non-verbal communication then you might want to check out the following links:

  • ASPEN of America Home Page
    http://www.asperger.org/

    Well, thats all there is for now. Thanks for visiting the AD(H)D section of FDISK.COM. Comments, suggestions and additions can be sent via my comment form. If you were just browsing I hope I gave you something new to think about or at least didn't bore you. To the AD(H)D'ers I wish you luck in your quest for personal success. And if you just read my pages and said OH MY &*@...welcome to the club!

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    (1) Answers To Distraction by Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. and John J. Ratey, M.D. ISBN 0-553-37821-X